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Our Lady Queen of Heaven Catholic Primary School

Better Never Stops

English

Intent:

  • for children to read easily, fluently and with good understanding
  • develop the habit of reading widely and often, for both pleasure and information
  • acquire a wide vocabulary, an understanding of grammar and knowledge of linguistic   conventions for reading, writing and spoken language
  • appreciate our rich and varied literary heritage
  • write clearly, accurately and coherently, adapting their language and style in and for a range of contexts, purposes and audiences
  • use discussion in order to learn; they should be able to elaborate and explain clearly their understanding and ideas
  • be competent in the arts of speaking and listening, making formal presentations, demonstrating to others and participating in debate
  • to leave school with the knowledge and skills required for future life

 

Implementation:

 

  • teach comprehension, spelling, grammar and punctuation through weekly timetabled lessons
  • teach writing through teacher modelling plus shared, paired and individual writing during English lessons, use the scheme “pathways to write” as a scheme.
  • In EYFS and  KS1 children’s books are matched to their phonics abilities
  • pupils will take part in extended writing session every week, these are clearly signposted  in English books as hot writes or cold writes.  
  • systematically teach handwriting weekly using the Oxford Owl scheme
  • promote excellent handwriting from the pupils through the examples from the teachers on displays and through modelling
  • provide a variety of opportunities for spoken language, role-play and drama so that children can organise and reflect upon their learning
  • encourage the use of ‘Talk Partners’ and ‘Talk Teams’ to allow children to develop their oral skills and their ability to communicate and cooperate with their peers
  • provide all children with access to a wide range of books for personal reading through access to a school library, class library as well as levelled books
  • ensure children in all classes take home appropriate books
  • use ICT alongside English to produce work and support learning  
  • provide a rich literacy and  simulating environment for the children through displays and resources
  • explicitly teach reading in English lessons and in Guided reading lessons
  • in EYFS and Y1 teach phonics daily, through the Song of Sounds programme, in Year 2

3 x a  week

  • provide phonics sessions for children in KS2 who need additional support in reading  
  • widen the reading experience and knowledge for children of a variety of genres and authors
  • provide children with enrichment opportunities in Literacy, library visits, library vans, visiting authors. World book weeks
  • Children have the opportunity to choose how to present their work and take ownership of their work
  • Children are read to daily so they experience a book being read aloud with fluency intonation and expression. They are also exposed to a rich diet of texts

 

          Planning

  • English is a core subject that is taught across the whole school curriculum.
  • teachers use Pathways to Write for writing. Song of Sounds for phonics and NC curriculum for reading teaching. Teachers also refer to progression documents.
  • class teachers complete a weekly (short-term) plan for the teaching of English. This lists the specific learning objectives and expected outcomes for each lesson,  and gives details of how the lessons are to be taught, including SEND and AMA
  • planning in English builds on the pupil's prior learning, knowledge and skills. All lessons include adaptation and differentiation.
  • pupil view is carried out to asses children’s understanding, interests and needs

 

 The Foundation Stage  

With play and structured activities, we cover the Early Learning Goals as set out in the updated EYFS framework September 2021.

In foundation stage we:

  • plan for and provide opportunities and encouragement for children to use their skills in a range of situations and for a range of purposes
  • support and develop children’s confidence
  • enable children to build their communication skills, which will help them to build social relationships
  • plan activities and experiences that engage all the senses, including music, songs, rhymes and dance
  • plan many opportunities for children to interact with others
  • give children daily opportunities to share and enjoy a wide range of fiction and non-fiction books, rhymes, music, songs, poetry and stories
  • allow children to see adults reading and writing and encourage children to experiment with writing themselves
  • plan an environment that is stimulating for children from all backgrounds and cultures
  • give children the opportunity to use ICT as an alternative form of communication
  • provide time and relaxed opportunities for children to develop spoken language through sustained conversations between children and adults
  • show particular awareness of, and sensitivity to the needs of children learning English as an additional language
  • link language with physical movement with action songs and rhymes
  • actively involve parents in the development of their child’s language skills

 

Communication and Language

This covers all aspects of language development and provides the foundation for literacy skills. Children’s developing competence in the spoken word and listening is focused on.

We aim to extend and enrich the children’s vocabulary through:

  • story time, rhymes, role-play and group discussions.
  • children are encouraged to share their own experiences through speaking and acting out events in imaginative play and talking about their own ideas.
  • children are encouraged to take part in class activities such as working with puppets, participating in music sessions and saying rhymes and singing songs together.
  • the Word and Makaton sign of the week are introduced on a weekly basis
  • at the start the year the Language Screen Assessment tool is used to help assess children’s language skills.
  • Nuffield Early Language Intervention is used to support targeted children who are identified as having a language need.

 

 Literacy (Reading and writing)

We have a variety of resources for the children to use to help them develop early literacy skills.

  • children are encouraged to use the mark-making areas indoors and outdoors independently but they also take part in teacher-led activities.
  • these activities include whole class shared reading, phonics sessions and small group guided reading and writing.
  • the pre-writing work encourages correct pencil control, left/right orientation and cursive letter formation. Children have the opportunity to develop their writing skills in accordance with their age, ability and competence.
  • we encourage children to treat books and other resources with respect and they are given many opportunities to listen to stories told by the staff.
  • phonics is taught through the Song of Sounds programme. Children sing songs, links these to actions and have clear visuals to cater to different learning styles
  •  

Observation, Assessment and Planning

  • planning within the EYFS is based on ongoing assessment and observation.
  • plans are flexible so that teachers can respond to the needs, achievements and interests of the children. This will be indicated on weekly planning.
  • fostering of the children’s interests develops a high level of motivation for the children’s learning.
  • we make regular assessments of children’s learning and we use this information to ensure that future planning reflects identified needs.
  • assessment in the Foundation Stage takes the form of both formal and informal observations. These observations are recorded in a variety of ways, and contribute to the child’s Tapestry individual learning journey.
  • at the end of the EYFS year in school, each child’s level of development is recorded against the 17 Early Learning Goals. 5 Contribution of English to teaching in other curriculum areas The skills that children develop in English are linked to, and applied in, every subject of our curriculum. The children's skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening enable them to communicate and express themselves in all areas of their work at school

 

SEND

Through our English teaching, we provide learning opportunities that enable all pupils to make good progress.

We strive hard to meet the needs of those pupils with special educational needs, those with disabilities, those with special gifts and talents, and those learning English as an additional language. We take all reasonable steps to achieve this. Specific intervention will lead to the creation of an Individual Education Plan (IEP) for children with special educational needs. The IEP may include, as appropriate, specific targets relating to English. Other children who need further support will also receive an individual plan to develop their learning.

All English lessons should include evidence of differentiation, adaption. Differentiation may be through activity or outcome. Adaptation can be personalised by subjects and by child.

This could include the use of:

       -word mats

        -lap tops

-sensory breaks/ circuits/ resources

-cloze procedures

 

 

EAL

At OLQOH over half of our pupils have English as an additional language. We strive to support their learning in a variety of ways

-pre teach vocabulary for lessons

-key words dual language work mats

-an EAL keyworker

-giving children further time to answer questions and compose ideas

 

Assessment

 

  • short-term assessments that teachers make as part of every lesson help them to annotate and adjust their daily plans.
  • written or verbal feedback is given to help guide children's progress often through marking. This feedback gives the children positive encouragement on the work produced and also a way to improve or a next step
  • teachers use medium-term assessments to measure progress against the key objectives, and to help them plan for the next unit of work. These results are used to ensure that the pupils make progress throughout the year and the work is set appropriately
  • moderation meetings are held between year groups to ensure writing levels are being used consistently. Locality moderations events are also held in local schools to agree levelling of work.
  • progress is shared with parents at parent’s consultations two times a year and with an end of year report
  • assessments are held from Years 2-6 three times in a year.
  • teachers make assessments towards the end of the school year, and they use these to assess progress against school and national targets.
  • children’s levels are inputted into a central shared system 3 times a year and these are overseen by the assessment lead.
  • assessments are available for all subjects leaders to review.
  • pupil progress meeting are held 3 times a year between class teachers and head teacher to identify progression and levels.
  • children who do not make ARE should have been identified during the course of the year.

For children who are not making ARE, interventions will be set up between class teachers and SEND leaders to close the gap. These will be reviewed every 6 weeks to assess impact.

  • assessments are based on tests, teacher assessments and are triangulated with work in books.

 

 

Resources/ Environment

  • all classes have a designated book corner that children can use. There is a variety of texts available
  • all classes have designated time in the school library to access books to take home
  • every class has a working wall linked to learning developed that week. Resources to support their learning is displayed.  Modelled writing and children’s work is also displayed.
  • phonics and words  are on display or added to as they are learnt.
  • Key words/ phonics word mats are available for children to access.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Subject leader

 

The coordination and planning of the English curriculum are the responsibility of the subject leader, who supports colleagues in their teaching, by

  • keeping informed about current developments in English and by providing a strategic lead and direction for this subject
  • giving the head teacher an annual summary report which evaluates the strengths and weaknesses in English and indicates areas for further improvement
  • uses specially allocated regular leadership time to review planning, evidence of the children's work and to observe English lessons across the school
  • analyse data focusing on groups
  • regularly updating policies and progression documents
  • meeting with link governor 3 x a year. Subject leaders share updates on their subjects 3 x a year in staff meetings as well as leading subject related staff meetings.
  • professional development  support is provided when staff request additional support through staff voice, when new initiatives are introduced , to refresh learners or for new staff.
  •  

 

Impact

The impact on our children is clear: progress, sustained learning and transferrable skills.  We aim that by the end of KS2 our children will be ready for Secondary school, equipped with the skills they need to progress successfully.

Our children leave OLQOH: 

-confident writers in a variety of genres a skills they can carry across all curriculum areas.  

- as  confident, fluent readers, realising the importance of reading for pleasure along with reading for information and knowledge. 

As all aspects of English are an integral part of the curriculum, cross curricular writing standards have also improved and skills taught in the English lesson are transferred into other subjects; this shows consolidation of skills, progression and a deeper understanding of how and when to use specific grammar, punctuation and grammar objectives.  We hope that as children move on from us to further their education and learning that their creativity, passion for English and high aspirations travel with them and continue to grow and develop as they do.

 

C. Reddick March 2024

Intent:

  • for children to read easily, fluently and with good understanding
  • develop the habit of reading widely and often, for both pleasure and information
  • acquire a wide vocabulary, an understanding of grammar and knowledge of linguistic   conventions for reading, writing and spoken language
  • appreciate our rich and varied literary heritage
  • write clearly, accurately and coherently, adapting their language and style in and for a range of contexts, purposes and audiences
  • use discussion in order to learn; they should be able to elaborate and explain clearly their understanding and ideas
  • be competent in the arts of speaking and listening, making formal presentations, demonstrating to others and participating in debate
  • to leave school with the knowledge and skills required for future life

 

Implementation:

 

  • teach comprehension, spelling, grammar and punctuation through weekly timetabled lessons
  • teach writing through teacher modelling plus shared, paired and individual writing during English lessons, use the scheme “pathways to write” as a scheme.
  • In EYFS and  KS1 children’s books are matched to their phonics abilities
  • pupils will take part in extended writing session every week, these are clearly signposted  in English books as hot writes or cold writes.  
  • systematically teach handwriting weekly using the Oxford Owl scheme
  • promote excellent handwriting from the pupils through the examples from the teachers on displays and through modelling
  • provide a variety of opportunities for spoken language, role-play and drama so that children can organise and reflect upon their learning
  • encourage the use of ‘Talk Partners’ and ‘Talk Teams’ to allow children to develop their oral skills and their ability to communicate and cooperate with their peers
  • provide all children with access to a wide range of books for personal reading through access to a school library, class library as well as levelled books
  • ensure children in all classes take home appropriate books
  • use ICT alongside English to produce work and support learning  
  • provide a rich literacy and  simulating environment for the children through displays and resources
  • explicitly teach reading in English lessons and in Guided reading lessons
  • in EYFS and Y1 teach phonics daily, through the Song of Sounds programme, in Year 2

3 x a  week

  • provide phonics sessions for children in KS2 who need additional support in reading  
  • widen the reading experience and knowledge for children of a variety of genres and authors
  • provide children with enrichment opportunities in Literacy, library visits, library vans, visiting authors. World book weeks
  • Children have the opportunity to choose how to present their work and take ownership of their work
  • Children are read to daily so they experience a book being read aloud with fluency intonation and expression. They are also exposed to a rich diet of texts

 

          Planning

  • English is a core subject that is taught across the whole school curriculum.
  • teachers use Pathways to Write for writing. Song of Sounds for phonics and NC curriculum for reading teaching. Teachers also refer to progression documents.
  • class teachers complete a weekly (short-term) plan for the teaching of English. This lists the specific learning objectives and expected outcomes for each lesson,  and gives details of how the lessons are to be taught, including SEND and AMA
  • planning in English builds on the pupil's prior learning, knowledge and skills. All lessons include adaptation and differentiation.
  • pupil view is carried out to asses children’s understanding, interests and needs

 

 The Foundation Stage  

With play and structured activities, we cover the Early Learning Goals as set out in the updated EYFS framework September 2021.

In foundation stage we:

  • plan for and provide opportunities and encouragement for children to use their skills in a range of situations and for a range of purposes
  • support and develop children’s confidence
  • enable children to build their communication skills, which will help them to build social relationships
  • plan activities and experiences that engage all the senses, including music, songs, rhymes and dance
  • plan many opportunities for children to interact with others
  • give children daily opportunities to share and enjoy a wide range of fiction and non-fiction books, rhymes, music, songs, poetry and stories
  • allow children to see adults reading and writing and encourage children to experiment with writing themselves
  • plan an environment that is stimulating for children from all backgrounds and cultures
  • give children the opportunity to use ICT as an alternative form of communication
  • provide time and relaxed opportunities for children to develop spoken language through sustained conversations between children and adults
  • show particular awareness of, and sensitivity to the needs of children learning English as an additional language
  • link language with physical movement with action songs and rhymes
  • actively involve parents in the development of their child’s language skills

 

Communication and Language

This covers all aspects of language development and provides the foundation for literacy skills. Children’s developing competence in the spoken word and listening is focused on.

We aim to extend and enrich the children’s vocabulary through:

  • story time, rhymes, role-play and group discussions.
  • children are encouraged to share their own experiences through speaking and acting out events in imaginative play and talking about their own ideas.
  • children are encouraged to take part in class activities such as working with puppets, participating in music sessions and saying rhymes and singing songs together.
  • the Word and Makaton sign of the week are introduced on a weekly basis
  • at the start the year the Language Screen Assessment tool is used to help assess children’s language skills.
  • Nuffield Early Language Intervention is used to support targeted children who are identified as having a language need.

 

 Literacy (Reading and writing)

We have a variety of resources for the children to use to help them develop early literacy skills.

  • children are encouraged to use the mark-making areas indoors and outdoors independently but they also take part in teacher-led activities.
  • these activities include whole class shared reading, phonics sessions and small group guided reading and writing.
  • the pre-writing work encourages correct pencil control, left/right orientation and cursive letter formation. Children have the opportunity to develop their writing skills in accordance with their age, ability and competence.
  • we encourage children to treat books and other resources with respect and they are given many opportunities to listen to stories told by the staff.
  • phonics is taught through the Song of Sounds programme. Children sing songs, links these to actions and have clear visuals to cater to different learning styles
  •  

Observation, Assessment and Planning

  • planning within the EYFS is based on ongoing assessment and observation.
  • plans are flexible so that teachers can respond to the needs, achievements and interests of the children. This will be indicated on weekly planning.
  • fostering of the children’s interests develops a high level of motivation for the children’s learning.
  • we make regular assessments of children’s learning and we use this information to ensure that future planning reflects identified needs.
  • assessment in the Foundation Stage takes the form of both formal and informal observations. These observations are recorded in a variety of ways, and contribute to the child’s Tapestry individual learning journey.
  • at the end of the EYFS year in school, each child’s level of development is recorded against the 17 Early Learning Goals. 5 Contribution of English to teaching in other curriculum areas The skills that children develop in English are linked to, and applied in, every subject of our curriculum. The children's skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening enable them to communicate and express themselves in all areas of their work at school

 

SEND

Through our English teaching, we provide learning opportunities that enable all pupils to make good progress.

We strive hard to meet the needs of those pupils with special educational needs, those with disabilities, those with special gifts and talents, and those learning English as an additional language. We take all reasonable steps to achieve this. Specific intervention will lead to the creation of an Individual Education Plan (IEP) for children with special educational needs. The IEP may include, as appropriate, specific targets relating to English. Other children who need further support will also receive an individual plan to develop their learning.

All English lessons should include evidence of differentiation, adaption. Differentiation may be through activity or outcome. Adaptation can be personalised by subjects and by child.

This could include the use of:

       -word mats

        -lap tops

-sensory breaks/ circuits/ resources

-cloze procedures

 

 

EAL

At OLQOH over half of our pupils have English as an additional language. We strive to support their learning in a variety of ways

-pre teach vocabulary for lessons

-key words dual language work mats

-an EAL keyworker

-giving children further time to answer questions and compose ideas

 

Assessment

 

  • short-term assessments that teachers make as part of every lesson help them to annotate and adjust their daily plans.
  • written or verbal feedback is given to help guide children's progress often through marking. This feedback gives the children positive encouragement on the work produced and also a way to improve or a next step
  • teachers use medium-term assessments to measure progress against the key objectives, and to help them plan for the next unit of work. These results are used to ensure that the pupils make progress throughout the year and the work is set appropriately
  • moderation meetings are held between year groups to ensure writing levels are being used consistently. Locality moderations events are also held in local schools to agree levelling of work.
  • progress is shared with parents at parent’s consultations two times a year and with an end of year report
  • assessments are held from Years 2-6 three times in a year.
  • teachers make assessments towards the end of the school year, and they use these to assess progress against school and national targets.
  • children’s levels are inputted into a central shared system 3 times a year and these are overseen by the assessment lead.
  • assessments are available for all subjects leaders to review.
  • pupil progress meeting are held 3 times a year between class teachers and head teacher to identify progression and levels.
  • children who do not make ARE should have been identified during the course of the year.

For children who are not making ARE, interventions will be set up between class teachers and SEND leaders to close the gap. These will be reviewed every 6 weeks to assess impact.

  • assessments are based on tests, teacher assessments and are triangulated with work in books.

 

 

Resources/ Environment

  • all classes have a designated book corner that children can use. There is a variety of texts available
  • all classes have designated time in the school library to access books to take home
  • every class has a working wall linked to learning developed that week. Resources to support their learning is displayed.  Modelled writing and children’s work is also displayed.
  • phonics and words  are on display or added to as they are learnt.
  • Key words/ phonics word mats are available for children to access.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Subject leader

 

The coordination and planning of the English curriculum are the responsibility of the subject leader, who supports colleagues in their teaching, by

  • keeping informed about current developments in English and by providing a strategic lead and direction for this subject
  • giving the head teacher an annual summary report which evaluates the strengths and weaknesses in English and indicates areas for further improvement
  • uses specially allocated regular leadership time to review planning, evidence of the children's work and to observe English lessons across the school
  • analyse data focusing on groups
  • regularly updating policies and progression documents
  • meeting with link governor 3 x a year. Subject leaders share updates on their subjects 3 x a year in staff meetings as well as leading subject related staff meetings.
  • professional development  support is provided when staff request additional support through staff voice, when new initiatives are introduced , to refresh learners or for new staff.
  •  

 

Impact

The impact on our children is clear: progress, sustained learning and transferrable skills.  We aim that by the end of KS2 our children will be ready for Secondary school, equipped with the skills they need to progress successfully.

Our children leave OLQOH: 

-confident writers in a variety of genres a skills they can carry across all curriculum areas.  

- as  confident, fluent readers, realising the importance of reading for pleasure along with reading for information and knowledge. 

As all aspects of English are an integral part of the curriculum, cross curricular writing standards have also improved and skills taught in the English lesson are transferred into other subjects; this shows consolidation of skills, progression and a deeper understanding of how and when to use specific grammar, punctuation and grammar objectives.  We hope that as children move on from us to further their education and learning that their creativity, passion for English and high aspirations travel with them and continue to grow and develop as they do.

 

C. Reddick March 2024

 

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